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Ergonomics

THE CASE FOR GOOD ERGONOMICS

THE PROBLEM:

Workplace musculoskeletal injuries are the most common types of injuries in the [construction] industry, responsible for more than 1/3 of all lost workday injuries and about half of all compensation claims.(8) (4)
The leading cause of workplace injury is over-exertion resulting from lifting, pushing, pulling, holding, carrying or throwing.(1) (9)
According to Liberty Mutual (2014), these workplace injuries account for over $15 billion annually in direct costs to employers.(9)
Jobs that involve working from the bed of a pickup truck or cargo van expose the worker to awkward movements to access items in the bed, toolboxes or other storage containers located in trucks and vans.
The most common types of over-exertion injuries are due to poor ergonomic conditions in the work vehicle environment affecting the lower back and upper extremities. These injuries can occur suddenly or develop over time, becoming chronic musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs).(1) (9)
Creating a workplace environment with good ergonomics reduces these injuries, saves money and leads to more productive workers.(1) (11)

THE SOLUTION:

Equipping vehicles with more ergonomically correct solutions mitigates exposure to these awkward positions reducing such injuries, reducing costs and increasing productivity.(1) (11)

POOR ERGONOMIC CONDITIONS:

FORCING WORKER TO ADAPT TO THE WORK

  1. Poor ergonomic conditions associated with manual material handling tasks include:
    • Awkward or stressful body postures e.g.,bending,twisting,over head work
    • Repetitive motions e.g.,frequent reaching,lifting,carrying
    • Forceful exertions e.g., carrying or lifting heavy loads
    • Pressure points e.g., leaning against hard surfaces or sharp edges
    • Static postures e.g.,maintaining fixed positions for a long time (2)
    • Work surfaces its too high, causing reaching, bending and lifting
  2. Handling heavy objects when lifting, bending forward or stretching upward and outward.(2)
  3. Twisting while bending, especially when exerting force to lift, push or pull objects.(2)
  4. Retrieving items from horizontal and vertical areas that can only be reached with excessive arm,head or trunk movement.(2)
  5. Bending,stooping,kneeling or squatting to retrieve items.(6)

TYPICAL AWKWARD CONDITIONS IN THE WORK VEHICLE ENVIRONMENT

SITUATION 1:
Stepping or crawling into bed of truck or cargovan

SITUATION 2:
Twisting torso to reach items in corner of truck bed or cargovan

SITUATION 3:
Bending and reaching too far

SITUATION 4:
Stepping onto tire or straining from ground to reach into bed

SITUATION 5:
Standing on tailgate or in bed stooping down to lift objects off floor

SITUATION 6:
Stepping or jumping down from vehicle after retrievingor replacing item

SITUATION 7:
Reaching over side of truck (or closed tail- gate) to reach item resting on floor of bed. Lifting item from low position over bed rail or tailgate.

CARGOGLIDE SUPPORTS OPTIMUM ERGONOMIC BEHAVIOR

CARGOGLIDE lets you work in your Power Zone. Reaching for items is greatly reduced and items are presented in the best ‘ergonomic zone.’

CARGOGLIDE brings work to the worker. Materials are presented at waist height in front of the worker,providing the most comfortable working posture. No twisting or unwieldy reaching is necessary. This ‘neutral posture’ minimizes stress on the body.

CARGOGLIDE creates a‘cut out’ work station. Reaching is no longer necessary. Awkward postures are eliminated and work is more efficient and productive with chances of injury at the vehicle greatly reduced.(2)

CARGOGLIDE reduces the degree of reaching and stooping to retrieve items which are in the truck bed or cargovan. Items are able to be reached easily and conveniently.

ERGONOMICS: CARGOGLIDE IN SUMMARY

CARGOGLIDE is the optimum ergonomic solution to typical material handling conditions in the work vehicle environment. CARGOGLIDE brings the work to the worker with rolling truck and van trays which presents and carries tools, hardware,and other necessary equipment at waist height.

WORK SMARTER.

SOURCES

  1. Ergonomics:The Study of Work-Occupational Safety OSHA Publication 3125.2000
  2. Ergonomic Guidelines for Manual Material Handling. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS).
    National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). Publication No.2007-131.April2007.
  3. SimpleSolutions: Ergonomics for Construction Workers. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS).
    National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). Publication No.2007-122. Aug.2007.
  4. Simple Solutions for Home Building Workers. A Basic Guide for Preventing Manual Material Handling Injuries. DHHS (NIOSH). Publication No.2013-111. June2013.
  5. Observation-Based Posture Assessment:Review of Current Practice and Recommendations for Improvement.DHHS (NIOSH). PublicationNo.2014-131.July2014.
  6. Prevention of Strains, Sprains and Material Handling Injuries in Construction (PPSX).
    Alliance Program Construction Roundtable.June2010.
  7. Strains, Sprains and Material Handling Safety Tips for Employers and Workers. Alliance Program Construction Roundtable. Oct.2010
  8. Laborers’ Health & Safety Fund of North America, The Power to Protect. Washington, D.C. Ergonomics and Construction-TheSmart Move.
  9. Foulks, Tim. “Ergonomics in General Construction: An Emerging Technique. Third Quarter 2015 Report by Safety Resources, Inc., Indianapolis, IN. July2015
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